Belief Systems, Mad in America and Anti-Psychiatry

As if a serious mental illness weren’t bad enough, people suffering from such conditions have to wade through a barrage of anti-psychiatry mumbo jumbo on asocial media – from Facebook and twitter, to respected newspapers. Mr. Ross unpacks the information in a few hundred words. My takeaway? Psychiatrists and neuro researchers–those people who have spent decades in school and working with the ski population – actually know more about how to treat the illnesses than the average, internet-informed obsessive who, like the birthers or climate change deniers, simply “knows” things.

Mind You

By Marvin Ross

I keep reading comments from people wondering how anyone could possibly support Donald J Trump. Fact checking his statements demonstrates how wrong he is on much of what he says. And then there are the numerous comparisons of statements that he makes that contradict each other.

Not so surprising, sadly enough, when we look at the people who believe what Robert Whitaker and the anti-psychiatry movement believe.

Put simply, Whitaker and the Mad in America anti-psychiatry folks are adamant that anti-psychotic medication for schizophrenia makes people sick and shortens their lives. Research fails to support these contentions but they persist and the data is ignored. The two latest studies provide overwhelming evidence that anti-psychotics help – but more on that in a moment.

The late Dr William M. Glazer of Yale writing in Psychiatric Times four years ago had this to say of Whitaker:

Should we accept…

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dering.katherine

Katherine Flannery Dering is a writer, feminist, and mental health activist. Her new book, Aftermath, was published in November, 2018.She is also author of Shot in the Head: A Sister’s Memoir, A Brother’s Struggle (Bridgeross Communications; 2014). Her younger brother, Paul, was diagnosed with schizophrenia at the age of 16, and she helped with his care. She writes about caring for her brother in hopes that it will enlighten the public on the role of caregivers. Her website is www.katherineflannerydering.com She is currently at work on two books - a mystery novel, and a nonfiction​ book about women, business and religion. Katherine holds an MFA from Manhattanville College, a BA from Le Moyne College, an MA from the University of Buffalo and a MBA from the University of Minnesota at Duluth. Her poetry and essays have appeared in Inkwell Magazine, as well as The Bedford Record Review, Northwords Press, Sensations Magazine, Pandaloon Press, Poetry Motel, Pink Elephant Magazine, River River, The Manhattanville Review, and Stories from the Couch. Dering taught Spanish briefly and is a former CFO at a community bank in New York. For more information please visit www.katherineflannerydering.com and find Katherine and her book on Facebook and Twitter.

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